Home > Saxophone quartet > Cwm Rhondda for Saxophone Quartet/Quintet S, A, T, Bari & Contra Bass

Cwm Rhondda for Saxophone Quartet/Quintet S, A, T, Bari & Contra Bass

Composer
John Hughes (1873-1932) Arranged by Keith Terrett
Arranger
Difficulty
Easy (Grades 1-3)
Duration
1 minute
Genre
Classical music
Instrumentation
Saxophone quartet
Related scores
Jazz it up ’When the Saints Go Marching In’ for Eb Alto Saxophone & Piano, Three Welsh Chorales for Saxophone Quartet (s, a, t & b), Lustpiel Overture for Saxophone Quintet, Arrival of the Queen of Sheba for two Soprano Saxophones & String Orchestra, What Shall We Do With a Drunken Saxophone Quartet (S,A,T, B+ Opt Bass Sax), Mattinata for Eb Alto Saxophone & Piano, Solveigs sang for Soprano Saxophone & Keyboard, Träumerei in F for Saxophone Ensemble S,S,A,T, & B, A Serenade for Bb Tenor Saxophone & Keyboards, Jasmine Flower (The) for Eb Alto Saxophone & Piano, Mattinata for Bb Tenor Saxophone & Piano, M’Appari Tutt’ Amor for Bb Tenor Saxophone & Piano, Solveigs sang for Eb Alto Saxophone & Keyboard, Allegro from the Trumpet Concerto in D arr. for Soprillo or Soprano Saxophone & Keyboard, Nessun Dorma for Eb Alto Saxophone & Piano, Jasmine Flower (The) for Bb Soprano/Soprillo & Piano, Fallen Heroes for Saxophone Choir, Jasmine Flower (The) for Bb Tenor Saxophone & Piano, Swing Low, Sweet Chariot for Bb Tenor Saxophone & Keyboard, Von fremden Landern und Menschen for Saxophone Quintet, Lost Patrol March (The) for Concert/Wind/Symphonic Band (Keith Terrett Classic March Collection), Paddy’s Day (St. Patrick’s Day) March for Concert/Wind Band, Swing Low, Sweet Chariot for Bb Soprano Saxophone & Keyboard, What Shall We Do With The Drunken Saxophone Quintet?, Eight Christmas Carols for Eb Alto Saxophone & Piano, Arrival of the Queen of Sheba for Saxophone Ensemble, Jazz Scale Patterns for all Treble Clef Instruments, Eight Carols for Tenor Saxophone & Piano, Twenty Minute Tango for Eb Alto Saxophone & Piano, Twenty Minute Tango for Bb Soprano Saxophone & Piano, Kanon in D minor, but not that one!, Badinerie from Suite No.2 for Bb Soprano Saxophone & Piano, Badinerie from Suite No.2 for Bb Tenor Saxophone & Piano, Arioso (Sinfonia to Cantata Ich steh mit einem Fuß im Grabe) for Eb Alto Saxophone & Harpsichord, Arioso (Sinfonia to Cantata Ich steh mit einem Fuß im Grabe) for Bb Tenor Saxophone & Harpsichord, Bollywood Tango for Bb Soprano/Soprillo & Eb Baritone Saxophone with Piano, Bollywood Tango for Soprinino & Tenor Recorder with Piano, SUO-GAN for Bb Tenor Saxophone & Piano, English National Anthem (Did Those Feet in Ancient Times) for Saxophone Quintet, American Last Post (Taps) for Concert Band, Golliwog’s Cake-Walk for Saxophone Quintet, American Military Marching Songs for Concert/Wind Band (Keith Terrett Classic March Collection), March from ’Judas Maccabaeus’ for Saxophone Quartet, March from Scipio in Bb for Flexible Band (School Band Series), Overture from the Suite in D from the ’Water Music’ for two Bb Soprano Saxophones & Keyboard, Mattinata for Bb Soprano Saxophone & Piano, Come Back To Sorrento(Torna a Surriento) for Eb Alto Saxophone & Piano, Allegro from the Trumpet Concerto arr. for Eb Sopranini Saxophone & Keyboard, Havana Rhubarb Rumba for two Eb Alto Saxophones & Piano, O Sole Mio for Eb Alto Saxophone & Piano, Solveigs sang (fra Peer Gynt Suite No. 2, Op.55) for Bb Clarinet & KB, Una Furtiva Lagrima for Bb Clarinet & Piano, For all the Saints (Sine Nomine) for Saxophone Quintet, Fanfare & Soliloquy Bassoon & Piano, Allegro from the Water Music for a quartet of Flutes, French Horns & Concert Band, Londonderry Air & Cavalry Last Post for solo Eb Cavalry Trumpet & Concert Band, Pachelbel’s Canon for 7 Bb Soprano Saxophones & 1 Bass Saxophone, Für Elise Boogie Woogie for Saxophone Quintet (Jazz for 5 Saxophones Series), Moonlight Serenade (Glen Miller) for Saxophone Ensemble (Sop,Alto,Tenor, Bari & Bass), Ode to Joy for School/Flexible Band, 3 & 1/4 Classic Favourites for Five Saxophones!, Keep the Fire Alive for Bb Soprano Saxophone & Concert Band, Be Thou My Vision for Voices & Keyboard, Lullaby for a Tenor Saxophonist, Keyboard & Double/E.Bass, Battle Hymn of the Republic ’’Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory’’ for Wind Quintet and Little Brown Jug for Clarinet Quintet (Jazz for 5 Wind Series)

An arrangement of Cwm Rhondda for Saxophone Quartet/Quintet.

Cwm Rhondda, taken from the Welsh name for the Rhondda Valley, is a popular hymn tune written by John Hughes (1873–1932).

It is usually used in English as a setting for William Williams’s text Guide Me, O Thou Great Jehovah (or, in some traditions, Guide Me, O Thou Great Redeemer),[1] originally Arglwydd, arwain trwy’r anialwch in Welsh. On account of a line in this English translation, the tune (and hymn) is often called Bread of Heaven.

In Welsh the tune is most commonly used as a setting for a hymn by Ann Griffiths, Wele’n sefyll rhwng y myrtwydd.

John Hughes (22 November 1873 – 14 May 1932) was born in Dowlais and brought up in Llanilltud Faerdref (in English: Llantwit Fardre). At age 12 he began work in Glynn Colliery in his home town and subsequently became a clerk at the Great Western Colliery Pontypridd where he worked for over 40 years. He served as a deacon and leader of the congregational singing in Salem Baptist Chapel Llanilltud Faerdref.[2][3] The first version of the tune, called "Rhondda" was written in 1905 for the Cymanfa Ganu (hymn festival) in Pontypridd, when the enthusiasm of the 1904–1905 Welsh Revival still remained.[4] The present form was developed for the inauguration of the organ at Capel Rhondda, in Hopkinstown in the Rhondda valley, in 1907.[5] Hughes himself played the organ at this performance, using the English translation of William Williams’s words because of the large number of English-speaking industrial workers who had immigrated to the area.[6] A number of his other compositions were popular during his lifetime, but have not lasted. The name was changed from "Rhondda" to "Cwm Rhondda" by Harry Evans, of Dowlais, to avoid confusion with another tune by M O Jones.

The hymn is usually pitched in A-flat major and has the 8.7.8.7.4.7 measure which is common in Welsh hymns. The third line repeats the first and the fourth line develops the second. The fifth line normally involves a repeat of the four-syllable text and the sixth reaches a climax on a dominant-seventh chord—emphasised by a rising arpeggio in the alto and bass parts. The final line continues the musical development of the second and fourth (and generally carries a repeat of the text of the sixth). On account of these vigorous characteristics, the tune was resisted for some time in both Welsh and English collections but has now become firmly established.

History[edit] William Williams Pantycelyn (named, in the Welsh style, ’Pantycelyn’ after the farm which his wife inherited) is generally acknowledged as the greatest Welsh hymnwriter.[9] The Welsh original of this hymn was first published as Hymn 10 in Mor o Wydr (Sea of Glass) in 1762. It comprised six verses.[10] (References to a five verse version in Pantycelyn’s Alleluia of 1745[11] appear to be incorrect.) It was originally titled Gweddi am Nerth i fyned trwy anialwch y Byd (Prayer for strength for the journey through the world’s wilderness).

Peter Williams (1722-1796, no relation of the author but well known for his popular edition of the Welsh Bible, with notes.[12][13]) translated part of the hymn into the English version given above, with the title Prayer for Strength. It was published in Hymns on various subjects, 1771. This translation is the only Welsh hymn to have gained widespread circulation in the English-speaking world.[14] The present-day Welsh version, given above, is essentially a redaction of the original to parallel Peter Williams’s English version. A result of the translation process is that the defining phrase Bread of heaven does not actually occur in the original (where the Welsh would be Bara nefoedd; it is a paraphrase of the references to manna.

The Welsh word Arglwydd corresponds more-or-less to the English Lord, in all its senses. It is used in the Old Testament to represent the Divine Name (the tetragrammaton) and in the New as the standard honorific for Jesus Christ. Accordingly Peter Williams translated it as Jehovah in accord with the practice of his time. Many English-language hymnals today translate it as Redeemer.

The following version of the original is taken from Gwaith Pantycelyn (The Works of Pantycelyn). All but the second verse is given, with minor variations, in the Welsh Hymnbook of the Calvinist and Wesleyan Methodists, published by the assemblies of the two churches.

Which method of viewing music should I use?

Score Exchange has two methods to display previews of music: seView which uses regular html and javascipt and the Scorch plug-in from Avid which needs to be downloaded and installed onto your computer. Both have advantages and disadvantages:

seView

seView, is the most compatible option. You should be able to view music on all modern web browsers including most mobile devices. Even if your device does not support javascript you should still be able to preview at least page one of the music.

You do not need to install any additional software to use seView.

Scorch

Scorch is a free plug-in from Avid for displaying and printing music. It can also play the music that you're seeing. As modern web browsers are updated, Scorch is no longer compatible with many browsers. Scorch has never been compatible with mobile devices and some web browsers on Mac computers.

If your web browser does not install Scorch automatically, you can click here to download and install scorch manually.

cloud scorch goes here

This score was submitted by Keith Terrett. If you wish to perform, record, or broadcast this music then you should contact them first.

In order to submit this score to ScoreExchange.com Keith Terrett has declared that they own the copyright to this work in its entirety or that they have been granted permission from the copyright holder to use their work. If you believe that this score should be not available here because it infringes your or someone elses copyright, please report this score using the copyright abuse form.