Violoncello from Swiss National Anthem (Swiss Psalm) for String Orchestra

Composer
Music by Alberich Zwyssig (1808-1854) Arranged by Keith Terrett
Duration
1 minute
Genre
World music
Other parts

An arrangement of the Swiss National Anthem arranged for String Orchestra.

The Swiss Psalm (German: Schweizerpsalm [ʃvaɪtsərˈpsalm], French: Cantique suisse [kɑ̃tik sɥis], Italian: Salmo svizzero [salˈmo zviˈtsero], Romansh: Psalm Svizzer [ˈpsalm ˈʒviːtser]) is the national anthem of Switzerland.

It was composed in 1841, by Alberich Zwyssig (1808–1854). Since then, it has been frequently sung at patriotic events. The Federal Council declined however on numerous occasions to accept the psalm as the official anthem.[1] This was because the council wanted the people to express their say on what they wanted as a national anthem. From 1961 to 1981 it provisionally replaced Rufst du, mein Vaterland ("When You Call, My Country", French Ô monts indépendants; Italian Ci chiami o patria, Romansh E clomas, tger paeis), the anthem by Johann Rudolf Wyss (1743–1818) which was set to the melody of God Save the Queen. On 1 April 1981, the Swiss Psalm was declared the official Swiss national anthem.

In 2014-2015, the Société suisse d’utilité publique is organising a public competition and unofficial vote to change the national anthem.

The Swiss Psalm (German: Schweizerpsalm [ʃvaɪtsərˈpsalm], French: Cantique suisse [kɑ̃tik sɥis], Italian: Salmo svizzero [salˈmo zviˈtsero], Romansh: Psalm Svizzer [ˈpsalm ˈʒviːtser]) is the national anthem of Switzerland.

It was composed in 1841, by Alberich Zwyssig (1808–1854). Since then, it has been frequently sung at patriotic events. The Federal Council declined however on numerous occasions to accept the psalm as the official anthem.[1] This was because the council wanted the people to express their say on what they wanted as a national anthem. From 1961 to 1981 it provisionally replaced Rufst du, mein Vaterland ("When You Call, My Country", French Ô monts indépendants; Italian Ci chiami o patria, Romansh E clomas, tger paeis), the anthem by Johann Rudolf Wyss (1743–1818) which was set to the melody of God Save the Queen. On 1 April 1981, the Swiss Psalm was declared the official Swiss national anthem.

In 2014-2015, the Société suisse d’utilité publique is organising a public competition and unofficial vote to change the national anthem

The Swiss Psalm was composed in 1841 by Alberich Zwyssig (1808–1854), with lyrics by Leonhard Widmer (1809–1867). Since then it had been frequently suggested it be adopted as the official anthem, but the Swiss Federal Government had refused several times, wishing to let the people decide what they want to sing on political and military occasions.

The Swiss Psalm temporarily became the national anthem in 1961. After a trial period of three years the Swiss tune was adopted indefinitely in 1965. The statute could not be challenged until ten years later but did not totally exclude the possibility of an ultimate change. A competition was set up in 1979 to search for a successor to the anthem. Despite many submissions, none of the others seemed to express the Swiss sentiment. The Swiss anthem finally got its definitive statutory status in April 1981, the Federal Council maintaining that it was purely a Swiss song suitably dignified and solemn. The popularity of the song has not been established. At least, it has been shown with several vox pops taken that many people do not know it at all, and only a small percentage can recite it all.

Proposed replacements for the psalm include: 1.In 1986, Roulez tambours (Roll the drums) by Romand Henri-Frédéric Amiel was proposed by the Swiss National Alliance. 2.At the end of the 1990s, The Fondation Pro CH 98 equally tried to promote a new anthem composed by the Argovian Christian Daniel Jakob.

2014-2015 public competition and unofficial vote

In 2014, the Société suisse d’utilité publique started a public competition for a new national anthem.[5] The instruction was to take inspiration from the preamble of the Federal Constitution of Switzerland. The jury received 208 proposals; it selected six of them and translated them in the four national languages of Switzerland. In March 2015, the six selected proposals were released on-line (with videos in four languages) and opened to public vote (until May 2015). The best three will be selected for a second on-line ballot between June and August. In September, a televised final has selected one song. Finally, the Société suisse d’utilité publique will propose the winning anthem to the federal authorities.

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