Tenor Trombone part from Mexican National Anthem for Brass Quintet (MFAO World National Anthem Series)

Composer
Composed by Jamie Nunó arranged by Keith Terrett
Duration
2 minutes
Genre
Classical music

The Mexican national anthem arranged for Brass Quintet.

The "Mexican National Anthem" (Spanish: Himno Nacional Mexicano), also known as "Mexicans, at the cry of war" (Spanish: Mexicanos, al grito de guerra), is the national anthem of the United Mexican States. The anthem first started being used in 1854, although it was not officially adopted de jure until 1943. The lyrics of the national anthem, which allude to historical Mexican military victories in the heat of battle and including cries of defending the homeland, were composed by poet Francisco González Bocanegra after a Federal contest in 1853. Later in 1854 he asked, Jaime Nunó to compose the music which now accompanies González’s poem. The anthem, consisting of ten stanzas and a chorus, effecitvely entered into use on September 16, 1854.

The "Mexican National Anthem" (Spanish: Himno Nacional Mexicano), also known as "Mexicans, at the cry of war" (Spanish: Mexicanos, al grito de guerra), is the national anthem of the United Mexican States. The anthem first started being used in 1854, although it was not officially adopted de jure until 1943. The lyrics of the national anthem, which allude to historical Mexican military victories in the heat of battle and including cries of defending the homeland, were composed by poet Francisco González Bocanegra after a Federal contest in 1853. Later in 1854 he asked, Jaime Nunó to compose the music which now accompanies González’s poem. The anthem, consisting of ten stanzas and a chorus, effecitvely entered into use on September 16, 1854.

A musical composition was chosen at the same time as the lyrics. The winner was Juan Bottesini, but his entry was disliked due to aesthetics. This rejection caused a second national contest to find music for the lyrics.[2] At the end of the second contest, the music that was chosen for González’s lyrics was composed by Jaime Nunó, a Spanish-born band leader. At the time of the second anthem competition, Nunó was the leader of several Mexican military bands. He had been invited to direct these bands by President Santa Anna, whom he had met in Cuba. About the time that Nunó first came to Mexico to start performing with the bands, Santa Anna was making his announcement about creating a national anthem for Mexico. Out of the few musical compositions submitted, Nunó’s music, titled "God and Freedom" (Dios y libertad), was chosen as the winner on August 12, 1854. The anthem was officially adopted on Independence Day, September 16 of that same year. The inaugural performance was directed by Juan Bottesini, sung by soprano Claudia Florenti and tenor Lorenzo Salvi at the Santa Anna Theatre (now known as the National Theatre of Mexico).

Jaime Nunó Roca (September 8, 1824 – July 18, 1908) was a Catalan composer who composed music for Mexico’s national anthem.

He was born on September 8, 1824 in Sant Joan de les Abadesses, a town in the province of Girona, in Catalonia, Spain. Both his parents, Francesc Nunó and Magdalena Roca, died before his ninth birthday. After their death, Nunó was raised by his uncle Bernard, a seller of silks in Barcelona, who financed his musical studies in that city. There he demonstrated his skill as a soloist in the city cathedral, for which he gained a scholarship to study with the composer Saverio Mercadante in Italy. Upon his return to Barcelona, he was named director of the Queen’s Regimental Band in 1851 and travelled with them to Cuba where he met and befriended Antonio López de Santa Anna, the former Mexican president.

When Santa Anna returned to Mexico in 1853 to again resume the office of president, he invited Jaime Nunó to lead the Mexican military bands. His arrival coincided with the national call to compose the Mexican National Anthem. Nunó participated, composing music for the lyrics of Mexican poet Francisco González Bocanegra, and was declared the winner on August 12, 1854.

After the overthrow of President Santa Anna, Nunó emigrated to the United States, where he worked as a conductor and opera director. One of the operas he directed toured the Americas in 1864. After a time in Spain, he returned to the U.S. and settled in New York, where he was found by a Mexican journalist in 1901. When this news reached Mexico, the current president, Porfirio Díaz, invited him to return; he did so and received various honors between 1901 and 1904. He died in New York on July 18, 1908. In 1942 the Mexican government ordered that his remains be exhumed and interred in the Rotonda de los Hombres Ilustres (Rotunda of Illustrious Men) in Mexico City, where they remain.

Need an anthem fast? They are ALL in my store! All my anthem arrangements are also available for Orchestra, Recorders, Saxophones, Wind, Brass and Flexible band. If you need an anthem urgently for an instrumentation not in my store, let me know via e-mail, and I will arrange it for you FOC if possible! keithterrett@gmail.com

Which method of viewing music should I use?

Score Exchange has two methods to display previews of music: seView which uses regular html and javascipt and the Scorch plug-in from Avid which needs to be downloaded and installed onto your computer. Both have advantages and disadvantages:

seView

seView, is the most compatible option. You should be able to view music on all modern web browsers including most mobile devices. Even if your device does not support javascript you should still be able to preview at least page one of the music.

You do not need to install any additional software to use seView.

Scorch

Scorch is a free plug-in from Avid for displaying and printing music. It can also play the music that you're seeing. As modern web browsers are updated, Scorch is no longer compatible with many browsers. Scorch has never been compatible with mobile devices and some web browsers on Mac computers.

If your web browser does not install Scorch automatically, you can click here to download and install scorch manually.

cloud scorch goes here

This part was submitted by Keith Terrett. If you wish to perform, record, or broadcast this music then you should contact them first.

In order to submit this part to ScoreExchange.com Keith Terrett has declared that they own the copyright to this work in its entirety or that they have been granted permission from the copyright holder to use their work. If you believe that this part should be not available here because it infringes your or someone elses copyright, please report this part using the copyright abuse form.