In Dulci Jubilo "In sweet rejoicing" for Wind Quintet

By: arr. Keith Terrett
For: Wind quintet
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In Dulci Jubilo "In sweet rejoicing" for Wind Quintet

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Composer
arr. Keith Terrett
Arranger
Difficulty
Moderate (Grades 4-6)
Duration
2 minutes
Genre
Classical music
License details
For anything not permitted by the above licence then you should contact the publisher first to obtain permission.

An arrangement of In Dulce Jubilo for Wind Quintet.

In dulci jubilo ("In sweet rejoicing") is a traditional Christmas carol. In its original setting, the carol is a macaronic text of German and Latin dating from the Middle Ages. Subsequent translations into English, such as J.M. Neale’s arrangement "Good Christian Men, Rejoice" have increased its popularity, and Robert Pearsall’s 1837 macaronic translation is a mainstay of the Christmas Nine Lessons and Carols repertoire. J.S. Bach’s chorale prelude based on the tune (BWV 729) is also a traditional postlude for Christmas service. Dieterich Buxtehude set the melody as a chorale-cantata in 1683 for soprano, alto and bass accompanied by two violins and continuo (BuxWV 52) and as a chorale prelude for organ (BuxWV 197) c. 1690.

Johann Sebastian Bach set this melody several times: as a chorale in BWV 368; and then for organ in BWV 608 as a double canon in his Orgelbüchlein and in BWV 729 and BWV 751 as a chorale prelude. Commentators agree, however, that BWV 751 is too simple and undeveloped to be the work of Bach. Bach also used the opening phrase of the melody as a fugal subject for two other choral preludes, BWV 703 (Gottes Sohn ist kommen) and BWV 724 (Gott durch deine Güte). BWV 729, written by Bach to accompany congregational singing in Arnstadt, is traditionally performed as the first organ voluntary at the end of the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols at King’s College, Cambridge. This voluntary was first introduced to the service in 1938 by organ scholar Douglas Guest. Franz Liszt included the carol in his piano suite Weihnachtsbaum in the movement entitled Die Hirten an der Krippe (The Shepherds at the Manger). Norman Dello Joio uses the theme as the basis of his "Variants on a Medieval Tune" for wind ensemble. Ronald Corp composed a setting of In Dulci Jubilo for unaccompanied SATB choir in 1976.

The original song text, a macaronic alternation of Medieval German and Latin, is thought to have been written by the German mystic Heinrich Seuse circa 1328. According to folklore, Seuse heard angels sing these words and joined them in a dance of worship.In his biography (or perhaps autobiography), it was written:

Now this same angel came up to the Servant (Suso) brightly, and said that God had sent him down to him, to bring him heavenly joys amid his sufferings; adding that he must cast off all his sorrows from his mind and bear them company, and that he must also dance with them in heavenly fashion. Then they drew the Servant by the hand into the dance, and the youth began a joyous song about the infant Jesus …

The tune first appears in Codex 1305, a manuscript in Leipzig University Library dating from c.1400, although it has been suggested that the melody may have existed in Europe prior to this date. In print, the tune was included in Geistliche Lieder, a 1533 Lutheran hymnal by Joseph Klug. It also appears in Michael Vehe’s Gesangbuch of 1537. In 1545, another verse was added, possibly by Martin Luther. This was included in Valentin Babst’s Geistliche Lieder, printed in Leipzig. The melody was also popular elsewhere in Europe, and appears in a Swedish/Latin version in the 1582 Finnish songbook Piae Cantiones, a collection of sacred and secular medieval songs.

The tune appears in Michael Praetorius’s Polyhymnia Caduceatrix & Panegyrica collection of 1619.

A polyphonic arrangement for 8 voices was made by Robert L. Pearsall (1795-1856), this being later adapted for 4 voices, the most commonly performed version, by W. J. Westbrook (1831-1894).

There have been a number of translations of the Latin/German poem into English. The most popular that keeps the macaronic structure is Robert Lucas de Pearsall’s 1837 translation, which retains the Latin phrases and substitutes English for German. A 2008 survey by BBC Music Magazine found this to be the second most popular choral Christmas carol with British cathedral organists and choirmasters.

Alternatively, a looser translation produced in 1853 by John Mason Neale titles the work "Good Christian Men, Rejoice". This translation is often criticised. In 1921, H. J. Massé wrote that it was an example of "musical wrong doing … involving the mutilation of the rhythm of that grand tune In dulci jubilo to the English words Good Christian Men Rejoice. It is inconceivable that anyone of any real musical culture should have lent himself to this tinkering with a perfect tune for the sake of fitting it perforce to works of inferior merit." He goes on to cite a more appropriate English translation from 1567 by John Wedderburn as a more "worthy effort".

Still another English translation, made in the 19th century by Arthur T. Russell and featured in several Lutheran hymnals, renders the work as "Now Sing We, Now Rejoice".

Need an anthem fast? They are ALL in my store! All my anthem arrangements are also available for Orchestra, Recorders, Saxophones, Wind, Brass and Flexible band. If you need an anthem urgently for an instrumentation not in my store, let me know via e-mail, and I will arrange it for you FOC if possible! keithterrett@gmail.com If you perform this arrangement in public, make a recording or broadcast it through any media, please notify the PRS (UK), or ASCAP (USA), or SOCAN (Canada), or APRA (Australia) or KODA (Denmark) or the equivalent organisation in your own country, giving the name of the arranger as Keith Terrett.

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Vedrò con mio diletto Aria: from the Opera "Il Giustino" for Bb Bass Clarinet & Keyboard, Vedrò con mio diletto Araia: from the opera "Il Giustino"for Flute & Keyboard, M’Appari Tutt’ Amor for Flute & Piano, Mattinata for Bassoon & Piano, Mattinata for Bb Clarinet & Piano, Allegro from the Trumpet Concerto for French Horn & Keyboard, M’Appari Tutt’ Amor for Oboe & Piano, Bollywood Tango for Piccolo & Bass Flute, Quando Me’n Vo (Musetta’s waltz) for Oboe & Piano, Lullaby for an Oboist, Keyboard & Bass, 3 & 1/4 Classic Favourites for Five Recorders!, 3 & 1/4 Classic Favourites for Five Clarinets! ( 4 Bbs & Bass), Queen of the Night Aria for Bb Clarinet & Piano, Three Gymnopédies for Bb Clarinet & Harp, Come Back To Sorrento (Torna a Surriento) for Bb Clarinet & Piano, Battle Hymn of the Republic ’’Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory’’ for Clarinet Quintet, Nessun Dorma for Bassoon & Piano, Mitt hjerte alltid vanker for Saxophone Quartet, Nessun Dorma for Bb Bass Clarinet & Piano, Berceuse (Opus 16) for Flute & Harp, Keep the Fire Alive for Solo French Horn & Concert/Wind Band, Battle Hymn of the Republic ’’Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory’’ for Wind Quintet, Moonlight Serenade (Glen Miller) for Recorder Quintet (Jazz for 5 Wind Series), 3 & 1/4 Classic Favourites for Five Saxophones!, O Sole Mio for Bb Clarinet & Piano, That’s A Plenty for Saxophone Ensemble, Tin Roof Blues (Rusty Nail Blues) for Clarinet Quintet ''Jazz for 5 Wind Series'', Moonlight Serenade (Glen Miller) for Wind Quintet (Jazz for 5 Wind Series), Allegro from Trumpet Concerto for Bb Clarinet & Keyboard, Moonlight Serenade for Clarinet Choir/Quintet (Jazz for 5 Wind Series), No. 1 of Trois Gnossiennes for Flute & Piano, Mitt hjerte alltid vanker for Recorder Quartet, Mitt hjerte alltid vanker for Wind Quartet, Keep the Fire Alive for solo Flute & Concert Band, Keep the Fire Alive for solo Oboe & Concert Band, Four Early Jazz Classics from the USA for Wind Quintet, Four Early Jazz Classics from the USA! for Clarinet Choir, That’s A Plenty for Recorder Quintet, That’s A Plenty for Clarinet Quintet (2 Bb’s, 1 Alto, 1 Bass & 1 Contra Bass in Bb), Come Back To Sorrento (Torna a Surriento) for French Horn & Piano, What Shall We Do With The Drunken French Horn Player?, Twenty Minute Tango for Bb Clarinet & Piano, Overture from Suite in D from the Water Music for two Clarinets & Keyboard, Quando Me’n Vo (Musetta’s Waltz) for Bb Clarinet & Piano, Franzosisches Lied: Est-ce Mars? for Recorder Consort, Franzosisches Lied: Est-ce Mars? for Wind Quintet, Chorale Partita with Seven Variations for Clarinet Ensemble, Solveigs sang for Bassoon & Keyboard, Sounds of the Pacific (Tagi Voli) for Concert Band, Von fremden Landern und Menschen for Saxophone Quintet, Von Fremden Landern und Menschen for Recorder Consort, Von Fremden Landern und Menschen for Flute Choir, Von Fremden Landern und Menschen for Clarinet Choir, Scenes from Childhood (Kinderszenen) Opus 15, for Wind Quintet, Träumerei for Flute & Piano, Nimrod for Clarinet Quintet, Salut d'Amour (Loves Greeting) Opus 12 for Bassoon & Piano, Moonlight Serenade for Oboe & Piano, Rondo Alla Turca for Bb Bass Clarinet & Piano, Rondo Alla Turca for Bassoon & Piano, Czardas for Oboe & Concert/Wind Band, Salut d'Amour Loves Greeting Opus 12 for Bb Clarinet & Piano and Tico-Tico no fubá for Flute, Bassoon & Piano

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